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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
with his liquid brown eyes and full lips and his brown hair brushed into submission and parted on the side, the stubborn to youngster who like his father couldn't bear to concede the point. in some ways he was a typical child in the 50's. he owned a leather jacket with fringe and the daniel boone had to the tail around the back said his mother. and he had the biggest collection of toy guns of every sort. when i spoke to my analyst about it, he said let him have them. he won't want to have any more of them when he grows up. but the death of the rosenbergs was an ongoing on spoken terror that predated his childhood. one day he summoned the courage to approach the subject with his father. could they get you and mom, he asked. no, we are artists. although his response wasn't particularly on point, he was somewhat comforted by this response. but tom's year for his parents didn't keep him from participating in political causes. he and his classmates spent many saturdays picketing the protesting the five and dime segregated lunch counter policies in the southern united states. ticketing woolworth
are disproportionately black and brown people in this country and they don't get a fair shake in the criminal-justice system. i'm not saying it's all prosecutors' fault. it's a complicated issue. there are many reasons that is the case but prosecutors definitely play a role. volume of one to say that prosecutors are intentionally discriminating, i don't think that at all. i do think that there is a lot of implicit body is going on when prosecutors are making decisions just as i think all of us in america suffer from implicit bias. the stereotypes are out there in the society that we are not even conscious of that cause us to act the way we do. i think it's very easy for a prosecutor to see the humanity and a defendant who looks like them. if there is a young kid that has his own private lawyer and a private lawyer is well represented and comes to a prosecutor and says he has a future, he's going to college, don't ruin his life because of this one case, the prosecutor can have empathy. the prosecutor might say why have a few indiscretions myself and if someone hadn't -- if someone had mercy on
who fought in the 1850s for free soil, he defended and wrote the first biography of john brown. represented as in any attempt to attract african-american immigrants. he traveled under a pseudonym and advocated land deeds. he let the attempts to create an integrated city in charleston, south carolina. he helped edit the autobiography of jefferson and davis. and he published the works of louisa may alcott and an abolitionist novel and found the most famous girl in 19th century america. not that -- right remark. [laughter] he acted as an agent for many of the most famous lectures of the time. he not only originated the system, he also personally identified with speakers and soccer participation so then they talked him into it. which works out great. there was a noted biographer widely read. [inaudible] she had built her career on the ashes of her early private life. and she went on to be an early feminist and an abolitionist. one of the things that you see with thomas nast is defending friedman and this woman whose lifestyle that is disapproved of. they were lifelong friends and m
but withdraws his opposition from the campaign. there are many other nameless people, black, white, brown who want to do something and upset by his death and a poor people's campaign is a good way to channel their energy whether donations are going to washington so you see an explosion of support for the campaign that sclc was not prepared to do with. the often did things by the seat of their pants and it worked out but they add as a major campaign to bring thousands of people to washington d.c. building the encampment on the national mall to house those people and run a small city all while trying to mourn the death of their friend and a leader. it becomes obvious how difficult this will be as the campaign moves forward. and a series of caravans' brings people across the country from the pacific northwest and southwest and the south to bring folks across the country to washington to descend on congress and did ministration to say you need to take property seriously. here is example number one probably the most famous caravan that brought people to d.c. a classic symbol of southern poverty of
that that was the case, and he said it frequently and emphatically. i talked to peter brown, the great expert, and he was told by catholics that oh, august teen -- augustine believed it, but he believed in the early code of the church, which existed, but never applied to what was given out at the agape meal. it applied to the creed, especially. when you were prepared for baptism, you learned the creed by heart. you were forbidden to write it down or to say it out loud anywhere where a nonbaptized person could hear it. that was the innermost secret of the faith, the creed. as i explored it more and more, there's a line of people in the middle ages kind of forgotten now for very good reason, they all had the view that's not really the literal body and blood, and i began to wonder why why do we never hear about the people? we didn't because they were condemned, but nonetheless, there was a tremendous argument about do we take this very literally? some people said, no, it's a symbol. it's gee -- jesus in a represented way. some said if the question came up, well, why is it not -- if it's jesus, why does
no sympathy for the brown v. board of education decision. when it was a crisis like little rock crisis, eisenhower did follow the law. he followed the constitution. he did what a five star general did. the hated this whole thing. anti-particularly didn't like adam clayton powell. he thought he was a demagogue. so i'm not sure what nixon's role in this, nixon was, you, nixon was very friendly with them because they kind of like each other. [inaudible] >> the issue was that he was actually influenced by advisers to him he won't be able to make a decisive decision not to include. so what i'm saying is that you feel as though nixon's personal politics towards african-americans during his administration were negatively affected by his advisors that surrounded him during that administration? >> i don't think the. you're talking presidents nixon, not vice president nixon spent but i'm talking about an event that happened during his vice presidential speeches are not aware of one or the other, i'm sorry. >> i think that richard nixon attitude towards african-americans were shaped by some assum
working for kellogg, brown and root. in 2003, they won a contract the range and cooking meals, delivering mail and building bases, to repairing iraq's oil industry. that you these contracts totaled more than $8 billion. when you think about the fact that we spend $100 billion in iraq, that, in fact, is a big chunk of the money is going to this one private company. >> in 2009, author kimberly kagan sat down with us in our "after words" program to discuss her book, the search. we will show you a section of the program the details of the increase of u.s. troops in iraq. >> host: i want to get in to the nexus of "the surge," and provide a little context for late 2006. because as casual observers of the war at all kind of blends together and bleach together, violence is escalating. buddy to look at 2006 as the bombing occurred in february of '06, he iraq study group at home is developing a more nuanced what it deemed to be a more nuanced plan for the future of iraq. that's a three prong question but where did it originate? how was it advocated transit over the course of 2006, because of violen
letter of john brown, represented -- travel to the south under a pseudonym before the civil reporting on slavery, advocated irish home rule so strenuously he became a leader of the land late in new york, let the attempt to create an integrated school system in charleston, south carolina, after tha the cy fell to the union forces in the civil war. but wait, there's more. helped to edit autobiographies of jefferson and davis. published the early works of louisa may alcott. and found the most famous beer in 19th century america. not bad, right? that's a nast met redpath. for many of the most famous lecturers of the time including henry ward beecher, the famous preacher, and mark twain. redpath originated a management system for lecturing which made it possible to lecture at the forefront more people into commit more professional. he personally identified speakers and softer participation. so he literally chased them down. nast wouldn't letter -- wouldn't answer any of redpath's letter. pcor mr. nast and talks to him. nast is in a desperate effort to get them to go wit. and he said if you
no, eisenhower was, had no sympathy for the brown v. board of education decision. he thought it was terribly disruptive to the society, and he -- when something, when there was a crisis such as the little rock crisis, eisenhower did follow the law, he followed the constitution. and he said -- he did what a five-star general did, he said overwhelming force, but he hated, he hated whole thing. and he particularly didn't like adam clayton powell who he thought was a demagogue. so i'm not sure what nixon, what nixon's role in this. mix son was, you know, nixon was very friendly with por row because they actually kind of liked each other, and that was a personal thing. >> well, the issue was that he was actually influenced by advisers to him in order to be able to make a decisive decision not to include him. so what i'm saying is do you feel as though nixon's personal politics towards african-americans during his administration were negatively affected by advisers that surrounded him during that administration? >> i don't think so. i mean, you're talking about president nixon, not
written by a friend of mine, brendan brown entitled the global curse of the federal reserve. if this is interesting to you come back to our next book event. all right. as we go to your questions let me remind you please wait for the microphone so we get you properly recorded so they can hear you, tell us your name and affiliation. if we put a statement first in the form of a question that is okay as long as it is brief, and if it isn't the chair will remind you your statement time is over. questions? up here in front. >> i have a question. mr peter wallison, it is one thing to say i told you so after the fact and i realize you have been riding along and looking for opportunities to be exposed with a variety of broadcast media. but i wanted to ask you what would have been your solutions legislatively and if in fact you have an opportunity to speak directly with alan greenspan who by the way mentions that he didn't publicly think dodd-frank would be strong enough for effective enough nor would it have been implemented to the fullest extent and only a third of the acts of dodd-
borders, territory, and the frontier and the warsome states have been about frontier, borders, and brown drinks. the trouble is in the 21st century, it actually happened almost 100 years ago in world war i and world war ii, we live increasingly in a -- if you loot weapons of mass destruction every one of those threats pays little heed to boundaries. every one of those threats is a cross-border challenge. every one of those threats represents a new interdependent. to take one example, al qaeda, one of the reasons al qaeda still lives despite the fact that the leadership is lick dated and drones are taking out the leaders along with a lot of other people who respect the leaders. nonetheless, the leadership is being lick with a dated. one of the reasons al qaeda survives it's what i call on the -- it belongs to no state. attacking states, laying low state governments, depleting the taliban, defeating al qaeda -- iraq. it will not stop it because terrorism, like sustainability, like markets, are interdependent in their character. so what we have created in the beginning of the 21st century i
mention his name anymore and that is john brown. today when i sat back and thought about it i sit troublemaker, jesus christ. they called him a trouble make her. so when all the dust settles i looked at john carlos and i said man hugh were dam good company to be called a troublemaker. [laughter] [applause] when i look back in terms of motivation there were many people swimming downstream with the words troublemaker. it did not deter me. i felt like if all of them were saying i was a troublemaker i know who the man in the mirror is a night know who john carlos is and i know what i'm right and if i have to take a so be it. the more that went against me the stronger i got. but i came back from mexico. it wasn't bad for me in terms of john carlos but my young son over there, i felt the pain because my son suffered, because my wife suffered, all of my kids suffered. when you have to wake up in the middle of the night and tell your kids to take their clothes off and put them up against the wall and having your wife think you lost your mind. to think about the fight goes on i have to say
the democratic opportunity to serve as senate leader for 20 years. he was followed at that meeting by ron brown who tragically lost his life in bosnia in a plane crash sometime later. he said about democracy that george mitchell pointed out he came here to this country because of economic reasons and he spoke of democracy in these terms. he said his ancestors came to america not because of economic circumstances but because they were in chains. at the same time democracy gave him the chance to participate in american life and serve it the highest levels of the administration. it was also evident though through the work of president clinton who refused to give up and often referred to be -- peace comes dropping slow and was also evident in the support given to ireland in so many ways by so many people in the senate and on capitol hill and both sides of the island deed in those capital buildings. that piece is as much yours as it is ours because of the environment of all of the united states. we know that america will want to sustain that with ourselves and we are very pleased as president obama
to four five before -- three to five before. it's four to six. the brown cost of war study put at $6 trillion. i put at $5 trillion. at a minimum it's at least a trillion higher. secondly, in terms behalf to do about it? , i mean, i have a number of proposals. on the veterans' issue, which is where i have spent a lot of my time, the first major recommendation is that we should be appropriating money to a veteran's trust fund at the time we go war. so right now we underprice war. we underprice war the same as if we said, you know, here is a car for $20,000 but in fact it's actually there's a hayden price tag of another tag of another $25,000. nobody when say that vote in congress gets to vote on the full cost. i mean, i think we should be appropriating the -- at least an additional 25% for every dollar war spending it would have the benefit of one, making people consider more carefully the true cost of war and putting money aside for the inevitable of veteran's benefit. i think we should prohibit the use of emergency money for war spenlding. it's supposed to be resphricting to -- rest
on a straight party-line vote, 60-40 with senator scott brown of massachusetts having been elected on a promise to block and kill the legislation, the american people consistently opposing the legislation, and they were able to ram it through before he could take office and cast the deciding vote. they got the absolute minimum number of votes, 60, to pass this monstrosity. i'm told now the regulations in the bill are six feet high when stacked up. we still have -- haven't seen them. and that legislation was 1,700 references to this section to be effectuated by regulations to be issued by the department. and regulations continue to be pouring out in record numbers, to try to clarify the hundreds, thousands of ambiguities in the bill. people's health insurance, we were told, would go down. that this was going to bend the cost curve to bring health care costs down. we warned that would not happen. who was correct three years ago? health care costs are surging. they're not through surging yet. we're going to have more increases as the health care bill takes effect in january of next year. the avera
by the watson institute at brown university, the war in iraq has cost $1.7 trillion, with an additional $490 billion in benefits owed to our veterans. most importantly we paid for this war most tragically in the loss of life and injury. we poured billions of dollars into nation building in iraq with little oversight or accountability. the special investigators general -- inspector general for iraq reconstruction issued his final report to congress last month detailing billions of dollars, billions of united states tax dollars lost to waste, fraud, and abuse. speaking with an iraqi official, special insector, stuart was told, you can fly in a helicopter around baghdad and other cities, but you cannot point a finger to a single project that was built and completed by the united states. mr. speaker, unfortunately these lost opportunities and tragic mistakes are not behind us. as the daughter of a 25-year veteran of the armed forces, i recognize the sacrifices our young men and women have made in iraq and continue to make in afghanistan. i am deeply concerned with the widespread incidences of pt
of wisconsin 213, brown 455 and scott 597. there be no second-degree amendments in order prior to the votes in relation to these amendments, not withstanding all time having expired and the resolution there be two minutes equally divided prior to each vote, that upon disposition of scott 597 the majority have the next amendment in order. finally all these votes be ten-minute votes. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. mrs. murray: madam president, i ask unanimous consent the clerk report en bloc. the presiding officer: without objection, the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from washington, mrs. murray, proposes amendments en bloc for mrs. mccaskill amendment 366, for mr. johnson of wisconsin amendment number 213, for mr. brown amendment number 455, for mr. scott, amendment numbered 597. mrs. murray: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: madam president, i would just add to what the majority leader said. senators have been very good in helping us work through our list on both sides. we'll have some more amendments
them just as that. i yield the remainder of my time to senator brown from ohio. mr. brown: thank you. we ask support of the vitter-brown-corker-pryor amendment. the independent community banks of america are supportive because they know the playing field isn't level. one real quick statistic, 18 years ago, the six biggest u.s. banks had assets equal to 18% of g.d.p. today it's 65% of g.d.p. i ask for your support of the amendment. mrs. murray: mr. president, i don't believe there is any opposition to this amendment. i would ask the senator if we could have a voice vote on this amendment as well. mr. vitter: mr. president, we feel this is an important amendment and ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? at this moment, there is not a sufficient second. there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators in the chamber wishing to vote or change their vote? if not, the ayes are 99, the nays are zero and the amendment is agreed to. mrs. murray: move to reconsider. lay it on the table. the pr
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)